a soldier’s prayer

about these things

soldier

A SOLDIER’S PRAYER
I know you’re tired,
I know you’re worn, I know you’re torn
You’re losing all your hope
‘Cause you’re a long way from home
Oh, I know you’re worried
I know you’re scared.
I’d like to put my arms around you
And tell you I care.

Hope is in Heaven, not far away
Just close your eyes, he hears what you say.
Feel him around you, He’s everywhere
Reachin’ to touch you, Know that he is there.
Deep in the heart of a war,
He hears a Soldier’s Prayer.

Ask and he’ll protect you, guide where you go.
Keep you from evil that tears at your soul
Oh,speak to the Father,say what’s on your mind
It just takes a moment,if you’ll take the time

Hope is in Heaven, not far away
Just close your eyes, he hears what you say.
Feel him around you, He’s everywhere
Reachin’…

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Brandon Hale Fund Raiser – Never tell him the odds!

As many of you know, my friend Brandon Hale has Cancer. He is a tough guy and will beat this thing but he needs your help. He earns his living as a writer. It is his sole source of income. While undergoing treatment he does not have the strength to sit at the keyboard. Many have contributed to his cause through donations or with an event like this one in the video. Every little bit helps. On either side of this Blog page you will find links to his donation page if you want to help. Please give what your heart dictates. You can also Help by purchasing one of his many books at… http://booksfromhale.com/

Thank you.

It is amazing what goes through ones heart, mind and soul, when the flack is flying…Read and open your eyes.

It is amazing what goes through ones heart, mind and soul, when the flack is flying...Read and open your eyes.

Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War [Kindle Edition]
Dakota Meyer (Author), Bing West (Author)

“The story of what Dakota did . . . will be told for generations.”—President Barack Obama, from remarks given at Meyer’s Medal of Honor ceremony

In the fall of 2009, Taliban insurgents ambushed a patrol of Afghan soldiers and Marine advisors in a mountain village called Ganjigal. Firing from entrenched positions, the enemy was positioned to wipe out one hundred men who were pinned down and were repeatedly refused artillery support. Ordered to remain behind with the vehicles, twenty-one year-old Marine corporal Dakota Meyer disobeyed orders and attacked to rescue his comrades.

With a brave driver at the wheel, Meyer stood in the gun turret exposed to withering fire, rallying Afghan troops to follow. Over the course of the five hours, he charged into the valley time and again. Employing a variety of machine guns, rifles, grenade launchers, and even a rock, Meyer repeatedly repulsed enemy attackers, carried wounded Afghan soldiers to safety, and provided cover for dozens of others to escape—supreme acts of valor and determination. In the end, Meyer and four stalwart comrades—an Army captain, an Afghan sergeant major, and two Marines—cleared the battlefield and came to grips with a tragedy they knew could have been avoided. For his actions on that day, Meyer became the first living Marine in three decades to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Into the Fire tells the full story of the chaotic battle of Ganjigal for the first time, in a compelling, human way that reveals it as a microcosm of our recent wars. Meyer takes us from his upbringing on a farm in Kentucky, through his Marine and sniper training, onto the battlefield, and into the vexed aftermath of his harrowing exploits in a battle that has become the stuff of legend.

Investigations ensued, even as he was pitched back into battle alongside U.S. Army soldiers who embraced him as a fellow grunt. When it was over, he returned to the States to confront living with the loss of his closest friends. This is a tale of American values and upbringing, of stunning heroism, and of adjusting to loss and to civilian life.

We see it all through Meyer’s eyes, bullet by bullet, with raw honesty in telling of both the errors that resulted in tragedy and the resolve of American soldiers, U.S. Marines, and Afghan soldiers who’d been abandoned and faced certain death.

Meticulously researched and thrillingly told, with nonstop pace and vivid detail, Into the Fire is the unvarnished story of a modern American hero.

Praise for Into the Fire

“A story of men at their best and at their worst . . . leaves you gaping in admiration at Medal of Honor winner Dakota Meyer’s courage.”—National Review

“Meyer’s dazzling bravery wasn’t momentary or impulsive but deliberate and sustained.”—The Wall Street Journal

“[A] cathartic, heartfelt account . . . Combat memoirs don’t get any more personal.”—Kirkus Reviews

“A great contribution to the discussion of an agonizingly complex subject.”—The Virginian-Pilot

“Black Hawk Down meets Lone Survivor.”—Library Journal

War…a different century, a different country, a different purpose.

War...a different century, a different country, a different purpose.

Outlaw Platoon: Heroes, Renegades, Infidels, and the Brotherhood of War in Afghanistan [Kindle Edition]
Sean Parnell (Author), John Bruning (Author)

A riveting story of American fighting men, Outlaw Platoon is Lieutenant Sean Parnell’s stunning personal account of the legendary U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division’s heroic stand in the mountains of Afghanistan.

Acclaimed for its vivid, poignant, and honest recreation of sixteen brutal months of nearly continuous battle in the deadly Hindu Kesh, Outlaw Platoon is a Band of Brothers or We Were Soldiers Once and Young for the early 21st century—an action-packed, highly emotional true story of enormous sacrifice and bravery.

A magnificent account of heroes, renegades, infidels, and brothers, it stands with Sebastian Junger’s War as one of the most important books to yet emerge from the heat, smoke, and fire of America’s War in Afghanistan.

Featured Author of the Week, Scott Langrel

Featured Author of the Week, Scott Langrel

Scott Langrel was born and raised in Big Stone Gap, Virginia, a town nestled in the mountains of Appalachia. Which, by the way, is pronounced “apple-atcha”, not “a-puh-lay-shua”. His favorite TV shows as a kid were “Kolchak: The Night Stalker” and “Night Gallery” with Rod Serling. He was also drawn to books with larger-than-life heroes such as Doc Savage and Robert E. Howard’s Solomon Kane. He was (and still is) a big X-files fan, along with Lost, Supernatural, and The Walking Dead.
Scott prefers horror and thrillers where there is a real, supernatural villain as opposed to psychological horror, and he tries to incorporate such characters into his stories.